John Britt Workshop 1/24-26

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John Britt Workshop 1/24-26

375.00

Takes place on January 24, 25, and 26, 2020

This is a 3-day hands-on cone 6 electric glaze testing workshop which is designed to show students how to test a base recipe and get various colors.  On Friday we will be preparing test tiles with a base glaze and ten colorant variations. We will fire on Saturday in the cone 6 electric kiln and then on Sunday we will discuss the results when they are unloaded from the kiln.

The workshop will also be a general overview of ceramic glazes, focusing on cone 6 glazes, reduction and oxidation. We will discuss cones, kilns, firing dynamics and principles as well as applying those principles to various firing cycles. This will lead us into some basic classifications of glazes, like ash, celadon, temmoku, etc. It will be conducted in a casual question and answer format which will drive the content of the weekend. Glazes will be discussed in a practical and easy to understand dialogue designed to help potters gain an understanding of glazes, firing and glazing.

We will discuss how and why each type of glaze works and how you can achieve them, how to adjust your glazes and how to find new ones. We will discuss glazes from John’s new book: “The Complete Guide to Mid-Range Glazes: Glazing and Firing at cone 4 – 7” as well as his High Fire Book, but will go into more detail than the book allowed.

For a More detailed description, continue reading below.

This is a Cone 6 three day glaze testing workshop designed to show students how to test a base recipe and get various colors (color blend) as well as strength of colors (progression test).

It will also be a general overview of ceramic glazes, focusing on but not limited to cone 6 glazes. It is designed for beginner to intermediate potters. We will discuss clays, slips, cones, kilns, firing dynamics and principles as well as applying those principles to various firing cycles. Classifications of glazes, like ash, celadon, temmoku, etc will be explained. We will discuss how and why each type of glaze works and how you can achieve them, how to adjust your glazes and how to find new ones.

There will be a slide show on some type of glaze testing if time allows.

FRIDAY: 9 – 5 p.m.

Students come on Friday morning (9 a.m.) we talk a bit after introductions and studio rules. John explains information about the firing cycle, oxides, etc. for about 1 hour. Then we run a color test and possible a progression test if possible.

The students then get into groups of two. They make up a 1000 gram glaze base. They set out their tiles that have been made and bisque fired prior to their arrival, and label them with red iron oxide. They line up their solo cups then pour the glaze into the 10 cups and equalize by eye. That gives 10 – 100 gram glaze batches to which they add the prescribed colorants. Each student mixes a different base. Some are dominated by calcium oxide (ash glazes), some are dominated by barium, strontium, sodium or boron oxide, etc. They all use the same colorants. This way after they are fired the students can easily see the effects of coloring oxides as well as the way the base affects those colorants depending on the dominating oxide in the base.

Then they dip tiles into the cups. Since we are doing one firing in the electric kiln, participants will dip three tiles in each cup.  

Then if time permits, we will make a progression of red iron oxide. This means taking 10 tiles of porcelain and 10 dark stoneware. WE mix up 300 grams of a base and add 1% red iron and dip tiles, 1% more (a total of 2% in the cup) and dip tiles, then add 1% more for a total of 3% in cup and dip tiles, etc. Place on appropriate rack.

We then load the kilns making sure we have we have kiln wash on the shelves. The rest of the day is spent with questions or discussions on firing cycles, reduction and oxidation, cones, etc.

SATURDAY: 9-5p.m.

We come in and start the kilns in the morning. That way everyone gets to see the process from start to finish. We then talk about oxides, properties, clays, slips, safety, etc.

Finish firing by 3 – 5 p.m.

SUNDAY: 10 – 3p.m.

We come in and crack the kilns early so we can take them out by 11 a.m. We talk a bit and then unload kilns and label tables and sort tiles into groups. Take photos of glaze results.

Talk about glaze results.

Go home at 3 or 4 p.m.

Student provided equipment needed:

Scales for weighing small amounts of oxides (2 students per table and one scale)
Respirator or Dust mask for mixing
Journal
Sharpie marker
1 gallon bucket to mix test
1 immersion blender per group that fits into the Solo cup so they can be easily blended
Latex gloves
underglaze pencil


Studio equipment provided :

10 test tiles of cone 6 white porcelain per student
10 test tiles of cone 6 light stoneware per student
10 test tiles of cone 6 brown stoneware per student
Coloring oxides: cobalt carb, copper carb., tin oxide, zircopax, red iron, titanium dioxide, several Mason stains, like red and black, chrome oxide, etc.
Copies of glaze handouts
10 Solo cups per student
Red Iron oxide to mark tiles
Kilns and lots of kiln wash on shelves
Table
Masking tape and sharpies

We look forward to this amazing event! See you there.

Refunds will not be given once the workshop begins. There are no transfers.

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